About Science for the Church

Our mission

Strengthening the church through engaging with science​

We believe that churches are strengthened by engaging with science. Science for the Church looks to a day when science accompanies Scripture as a tool for discipleship, catalyzes expressions of worship, illustrates sermons, elucidates biblical teachings, and supplements theological wisdom for the life of the world. We even wonder if wrestling with science might draw some of the “nones” (those who affiliate with no religion) and the “dones” (those who have left the church) to Christian communities once again.

We believe that churches are strengthened by engaging with science. Science for the Church looks to a day when science accompanies Scripture as a tool for discipleship, catalyzes expressions of worship, illustrates sermons, elucidates biblical teachings, and supplements theological wisdom for the life of the world. We even wonder if wrestling with science might draw some of the “nones” (those who affiliate with no religion) and the “dones” (those who have left the church) to Christian communities once again.

Our story

​Experience to guide you and your church into the future

We are building on 10 years of leading programs like Scientists in Congregations and Science and Theology for Emerging Adult Ministries (STEAM). Having resourced 65 ministries, we are now positioning ourselves for the future. What does the future look like? In our effort to strengthen the church by engaging science, we are pursuing the following four priorities:

  1. Build a Movement
  2. Leverage Relationships between Clergy and Scientists
  3. Host Events
  4. Provide Resources

​​

We are building on 10 years of leading programs like Scientists in Congregations and Science and Theology for Emerging Adult Ministries (STEAM). Having resourced 65 ministries, we are now positioning ourselves for the future. What does the future look like? In our effort to strengthen the church by engaging science, we are pursuing the following four priorities:

  1. Build a Movement
  2. Leverage Relationships between Clergy and Scientists
  3. Host Events
  4. Provide Resources

​​

Your support

Help us build a movement

There are a few ways you can help us. First of all, you can contribute financially on our donate page to help us finish this new website to include resources the church can use to better engage science. All donations are tax-deductible. You can also sign up for our weekly email and spread the word about our work. Finally, you can expand our networks by telling others, by forwarding the weekly email, or by interacting with our Facebook content.

Please consider donating to help us finish this new website with an excellent set of resources the church can use to better engage science. All donations are tax-deductible. You can also support us by signing up for our weekly email and spread the word about our work. Finally, you can expand our networks by telling others, by forwarding the weekly email, or by interacting with our Facebook content.

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Meet the authors

Drew Rick-Miller | Greg Cootsona

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Should we baptize aliens? Does God act in the world? What makes humans unique? Is faith beneficial to health? Can science enhance sermons or be a tool for discipleship? What are the best practices for engaging science in ministry? We boil down complex topics and give you the resources you need to navigate modern science as means to improve your ministry. Every Tuesday, get our blog delivered to your inbox.

Meet The Team

Drew Rick-Miller

Drew is Project Co-director of Science for the Church and the lead editor of the weekly email. In addition to leading this project, he does freelance work on a range of projects including Science for Seminaries, Orbiter magazine, and programs at the Fuller Youth Institute and Biola University. Previously, he spent more than ten years with the John Templeton Foundation, most recently leading the Religious Engagement Department, where he developed programs helping religious leaders and media engage scientific content. Drew studied literature and physics at Northwestern University before attending Princeton Theological Seminary (M.Div.). Drew’s vocational passion is to help the church navigate the faith and science interface. Drew lives in Raleigh, North Carolina with his wife, a Presbyterian pastor, and their three daughters. He still proudly dons purple and cheers on his Northwestern Wildcats.

Greg Cootsona

Greg is Project Co-director of Science for the Church and Lecturer in Religious Studies and Humanities at California State University at Chico. He formerly served nearly 18 years as associate pastor for young adult ministries and adult discipleship in New York and Chico, California. Greg studied comparative literature at U.C. Berkeley and theology at Princeton Theological Seminary (M.Div.), the Universities of Tübingen and Heidelberg, as well as Berkeley’s Graduate Theological Union (the latter where he received his Ph.D.). He is the author of seven books, including Mere Science and Christian Faith, C.S. Lewis and the Crisis of a Christian, and most recently, Negotiating Science and Religion in America. Greg is passionate about the power of connecting mainstream science with “mere Christianity” to develop a flourishing, full alive, faith. He and his wife, Laura, live in Chico, California and have two young adult daughters. Besides hanging out with his family, he loves to drum, read great books, hike and bike through the beautiful Chico hills, and drink good coffee.

Dave Navarra

Dave is Assistant Director for Science for the Church and Associate Pastor at Rolling Hills Christian Church. Dave graduated from Fuller Seminary with his M.Div and spent many years as a youth pastor. He held both support and leadership roles with Scientists in Congregations and the Science and Theology for Emerging Adult Ministries (STEAM). Dave has a passion to see the church move the gospel of Jesus forward in areas of perceived weakness. He now lives just outside of Sacramento in California. He loves coffee, his dog, and his wife, but not in that order.

Heather Micklewright

Heather is Project Coordinator for Science for the Church, providing support for the organization’s various endeavors. Previously, she spent more than eight years as a Program Associate at the John Templeton Foundation where she supported the Life Sciences team. She first encountered meaningful engagement between science and faith at Eastern University during her undergraduate studies and remains fascinated by the subject because it provides a window through which to view God’s beauty, goodness, and truth. She lives outside of Philadelphia with her husband and three sons where she enjoys hiking, photography, and volunteering with her church’s youth group in any snatches of free time.

Upper House, an initiative of the Stephen & Laurel Brown Foundation, hosts Science for the Church. Upper House serves the University of Wisconsin and Madison communities by curating experiences of Christian thinking, being, and doing for personal transformation and for the life of the world. 

Based in University Square in the heart of the University of Wisconsin (Madison) campus, Upper House provides multi-experiential space and programming expertise, where people, faith, values, ideas, and the arts come together in a dynamic environment that fosters vocational, intellectual, and cultural formation. 

Drew Rick-Miller

Drew is Project Co-director of Science for the Church and the lead editor of the weekly email. In addition to leading this project, he does freelance work on a range of projects including Science for Seminaries, Orbiter magazine, and programs at the Fuller Youth Institute and Biola University. Previously, he spent more than ten years with the John Templeton Foundation, most recently leading the Religious Engagement Department, where he developed programs helping religious leaders and media engage scientific content. Drew studied literature and physics at Northwestern University before attending Princeton Theological Seminary (M.Div.). Drew’s vocational passion is to help the church navigate the faith and science interface. Drew lives in Raleigh, North Carolina with his wife, a Presbyterian pastor, and their three daughters. He still proudly dons purple and cheers on his Northwestern Wildcats.

Greg Cootsona

Greg is Project Co-director of Science for the Church and Lecturer in Religious Studies and Humanities at California State University at Chico. He formerly served nearly 18 years as associate pastor for young adult ministries and adult discipleship in New York and Chico, California. Greg studied comparative literature at U.C. Berkeley and theology at Princeton Theological Seminary (M.Div.), the Universities of Tübingen and Heidelberg, as well as Berkeley’s Graduate Theological Union (the latter where he received his Ph.D.). He is the author of seven books, including Mere Science and Christian Faith, C.S. Lewis and the Crisis of a Christian, and most recently, Negotiating Science and Religion in America. Greg is passionate about the power of connecting mainstream science with “mere Christianity” to develop a flourishing, full alive, faith. He and his wife, Laura, live in Chico, California and have two young adult daughters. Besides hanging out with his family, he loves to drum, read great books, hike and bike through the beautiful Chico hills, and drink good coffee.

Dave Navarra

Dave is Assistant Director for Science for the Church and Associate Pastor at Rolling Hills Christian Church. Dave graduated from Fuller Seminary with his M.Div and spent many years as a youth pastor. He held both support and leadership roles with Scientists in Congregations and the Science and Theology for Emerging Adult Ministries (STEAM). Dave has a passion to see the church move the gospel of Jesus forward in areas of perceived weakness. He now lives just outside of Sacramento in California. He loves coffee, his dog, and his wife, but not in that order.

Heather Micklewright

Heather is Project Coordinator for Science for the Church, providing support for the organization’s various endeavors. Previously, she spent more than eight years as a Program Associate at the John Templeton Foundation where she supported the Life Sciences team. She first encountered meaningful engagement between science and faith at Eastern University during her undergraduate studies and remains fascinated by the subject because it provides a window through which to view God’s beauty, goodness, and truth. She lives outside of Philadelphia with her husband and three sons where she enjoys hiking, photography, and volunteering with her church’s youth group in any snatches of free time.

Upper House, an initiative of the Stephen & Laurel Brown Foundation, hosts Science for the Church. Upper House serves the University of Wisconsin and Madison communities by curating experiences of Christian thinking, being, and doing for personal transformation and for the life of the world. 

Based in University Square in the heart of the University of Wisconsin (Madison) campus, Upper House provides multi-experiential space and programming expertise, where people, faith, values, ideas, and the arts come together in a dynamic environment that fosters vocational, intellectual, and cultural formation.