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Genesis 1 Through the Eyes of a Rabbi

So if we look at Genesis as poetry, not science, then we don’t need to do mental gymnastics to fit the square peg of Genesis 1 into the round hole of Big Bang cosmology or natural selection. Instead, we look at the words themselves, their style, and the word choices.

So Lonely

This is why the Surgeon General issued the advisory. “With more than one in five adults and more than one in three young adults living with a mental illness in the U.S., addressing loneliness and isolation is critical in order to fully address the mental health crisis in America.” I see a new headline about the crisis of isolation every couple weeks—whether it involves clergy, young people, older adults, or the general public. With each one, I begin to hear the “So Lonely” earworm and then wonder how the church can help.

We Are All Children of God

As we continue to explore the intersection of faith and science, it becomes evident that the quest for racial equality and justice requires confronting both conscious and unconscious biases. Black liberation theology challenges us to rethink traditional narratives and to recognize the divine activity in the struggle for social justice.

Genesis 1 Through the Eyes of a Rabbi

Genesis 1 Through the Eyes of a Rabbi

So if we look at Genesis as poetry, not science, then we don’t need to do mental gymnastics to fit the square peg of Genesis 1 into the round hole of Big Bang cosmology or natural selection. Instead, we look at the words themselves, their style, and the word choices.

So Lonely

So Lonely

This is why the Surgeon General issued the advisory. “With more than one in five adults and more than one in three young adults living with a mental illness in the U.S., addressing loneliness and isolation is critical in order to fully address the mental health crisis in America.” I see a new headline about the crisis of isolation every couple weeks—whether it involves clergy, young people, older adults, or the general public. With each one, I begin to hear the “So Lonely” earworm and then wonder how the church can help.

We Are All Children of God

We Are All Children of God

As we continue to explore the intersection of faith and science, it becomes evident that the quest for racial equality and justice requires confronting both conscious and unconscious biases. Black liberation theology challenges us to rethink traditional narratives and to recognize the divine activity in the struggle for social justice.

The Challenge of Bringing Unsettled Science to the Church

The Challenge of Bringing Unsettled Science to the Church

Recently Greg, assisted by neurorehabilitation psychologist Leonard Matheson, wrote about oxytocin in creating human bonds and facilitating loving connections. A friendly neuroscientist—one who is theologically trained and known to bring science into the church—reached out to us and noted that the science around oxytocin is not settled.

Love, Improvisation, and Neuroscience

Love, Improvisation, and Neuroscience

I started with oxytocin, improvisation, and human bonding, and through this connection, I’m honestly enthralled by how science helps us grasp how God created this universe so that we can form deep relationships with others. And this even leads to Christian practice.

Inspiration from a Man of Science

Inspiration from a Man of Science

I’m inspired that a 99-year-old vet and church leader drove to Raleigh to attend the BioLogos conference and our workshop and that he is going on the road to proclaim the harmony of faith and science to a neighboring church.

A Breath of Hope Amid Human Suffering

A Breath of Hope Amid Human Suffering

For liberation theologians, these ideas open the possibility of a framework where science and theology collaborate in discussing and developing new domains of critical thinking that result in liberation. Consequently, Boff suggests, this God of cosmic proportions calls us to a transformative process where the poor’s liberation (i.e., their salvation) becomes the point of reference in the science-theology dialogue and Christian praxis.

Happy Anniversary (of sorts)!

Happy Anniversary (of sorts)!

If you had told me back in 2017, we’d still be producing it seven years later, I would have doubted like Thomas. Yet, we continue to produce them every week because you read them. You tell us that they inspire your faith, equip you to talk about faith and science with others, and help you in the various ministries you undertake.

How about we make a little deal? You keep on reading, and we will keep on writing.

John Calvin and Science—A View Some Have Never Seen

John Calvin and Science—A View Some Have Never Seen

Delighting in the night sky above Lake Geneva, [Calvin] saw God’s glory in these flashes of light, ‘as if the stars themselves sang his praises with an audible voice.’ ‘Astronomy may justly be called the alphabet of theology,” he added, knowing that the stars “contribute much towards exciting in the hearts of men a high reverence for God.’”

John Calvin and Science—So Many Surprises

John Calvin and Science—So Many Surprises

“For in this world God blesses us in such a way as to give us a mere foretaste of his kindness, and by that taste to entice us to desire heavenly blessings with which we may be satisfied. As soon as we acknowledge God to be the supreme architect, who has erected the beauteous fabric of the universe, our minds must necessarily be ravished with wonder at his infinite goodness, wisdom, and power.”

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Science for the Church

280 Chico Canyon Rd.

Chico, CA 95928

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