A weekly dose of science for the church

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The Standard Model (of Particle Physics)

The Standard Model is the fundamental starting place for anyone trying to understand the stuff within God’s creation. Or to quote Kepler, the Standard Model is one of many ways we are now “thinking God’s thoughts after Him.”

Conversations, Connections, and even Conversion: A Ministry Profile of UCC Vermillion

What started as a joke – what happens when a pastor grabs a beer with a herpetologist? —ended with what could be a Science for the Church newsletter clickbait lede—“Church’s faith and science program inspires former president of student secular society to become a pastor.”

Following the Eastern Star of Epiphany

Many people have proposed different theories about the astronomical events that led the Magi to Jesus. While we might not ever definitely know the scientific event itself, there is enough scientific data to support the idea of a God that can use physical phenomena to accomplish his salvific purposes.

To Know The Christ Child

To Know The Christ Child

There are many ways to come to know things, and while the analytic, scientific perspective may be the preferred method for many in our Western, educated culture, it is certainly not the only way.

The God of Culture

The God of Culture

What difference does it make that Jesus was a cultural being, born into a specific culture? “With the incarnation, to quote Karl Barth, ‘theology has become anthropology because God has become man.”

When Jesus Was an Embryo

When Jesus Was an Embryo

“This Christmas, think about how our wise, loving, patient God entered the ancient Middle East—“Taking the very nature of a servant”—and trusted himself to the developmental processes that had been created through him.”

The Science of Wisdom

The Science of Wisdom

“In this advent season we remember the messy world Jesus entered. Born amidst controversy to an unwed mother who was likely a teenager, and in a smelly barn where he spent the night in a feeding trough, Jesus entered fully into our complexity. Throughout his years of ministry, he was controversial and unconventional, cutting through religious pretenses to show the heart of God.” Join us for psychologist Mark McMinn’s reflections on growing in wisdom.

Eight-Pound, Six-Ounce Baby Jesus

Eight-Pound, Six-Ounce Baby Jesus

It’s hard to wrap our minds around the idea of baby Jesus – fully God and yet with all the limitations inherent to human infancy. Fuller Seminary professor Justin Barrett guest writes our newsletter today, drawing on knowledge from psychology, cognitive science, and evolution to point to the beauty of this dependence and vulnerability.

Advent Wonder

Advent Wonder

In our 2019 Advent series, we will feature scientists reflecting on the question “What does it mean to say that Jesus was fully human?” We introduce the topic this week.

Grateful Dog

Grateful Dog

Gratitude is probably the most scientifically studied virtue. We could do a Thanksgiving edition every year and focus entirely on new research each time. We know the benefits of being grateful, and we know steps each of us can take to become more grateful. We even know how gratitude correlates with, and often cultivates, other virtues like optimism, humility, and forgiveness.

We’re Changing Our Name

We’re Changing Our Name

How might science work alongside Scripture as a tool for discipleship? Or how can it illustrate sermons, support the biblical teachings, and supplement the wisdom of the church? Can it be a catalyst for worship? May it even draw folks into our ministries, perhaps attracting the “nones” and “dones” to come back?

Hopeful Salutations

Hopeful Salutations

Let’s take a look at some of the scientific work on hope and optimism. Very little of it takes a theological perspective, but as you teach and preach true Christian hope, the science can surely be a good conversation partner.

The Problem of Pain

The Problem of Pain

Can we find any use for suffering? What does suffering do for us as followers of Christ and for our compassion for others?

Everything’s Not Right with the World

Everything’s Not Right with the World

Is there any way to respond to the fact that everything’s not right with the world? Let me suggest this as a different image for a theodicy: God and the world play together in a cosmic jazz improvisation.