A weekly dose of science for the church

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In Praise of John Polkinghorne

The Rev. Dr. John Polkinghorne will undoubtedly remain a preeminent voice in faith and science. He died March 9th at age 90. I met John Polkinghorne only once, at a small science and religion conference. I interrupted his breakfast for our notably awkward encounter…

Signs of New Life

St. Augustine famously defined a sacrament as “an outward and visible sign of inward and invisible grace.” This definition could be applied to much more than baptism and communion—perhaps even to tulips and sea slugs.

Mangoes From Heaven

Missionaries I have known live out the Great Commission and the Great Commandment by both showing and telling God’s love. They can spend years learning the needs of the people and place they serve and additional years finding the best way to meet them. And this missionary work has roused a number of scientists and engineers, which is why it interests us at Science for the Church.

A Quantum Series, Volume 3: Is God Rolling the Dice?

A Quantum Series, Volume 3: Is God Rolling the Dice?

Is the world fundamentally determined or undetermined?… All of these possible interpretations point to the enigma of the way the world really is. Does God play dice? Is there a reality to things before we observe them? Are there many worlds? Are there hidden variables that still elude us nearly a century after Einstein postulated them?

A Quantum Series, Volume 1: Can You Fathom the Mysteries of God?

A Quantum Series, Volume 1: Can You Fathom the Mysteries of God?

Quantum mechanics is so weird, so counterintuitive, and so poorly understood at the most fundamental level—dozens of interpretations exist trying to make sense of it—that it is risky to draw theological conclusions. Does God play dice? Do duality, observer effects, and probabilities truly describe the world God created? Or do they point to a veil that hides the microscopic world from us?

It’s All Greek to Me

It’s All Greek to Me

Why don’t our theological voices trust the sciences to offer an accurate picture of the world when we trust the science of classical Greek studies to offer us the tools to study the most sacred texts, the words that bring us to the knowledge of Jesus Christ?

Why Humility Matters

Why Humility Matters

Humility is something all church leaders need—and by humility, I mean something more than just a humiliating experience. It should be a frame of mind, an approach to the world that opens us up to learn what the Spirit has to teach us.

Pair Up With A Scientist. Your Church Will Thank You.

Pair Up With A Scientist. Your Church Will Thank You.

Scientists do want to get the facts right and to accurately investigate the natural world, but even more so, the ones in your pews—especially those on who sit on your boards, teach Sunday school, or volunteer with your youth—really want to be recognized not just as scientists, but as equal partners in the body of Christ. They want to be of service to the church.

Does the Church Need a Makeover?

Does the Church Need a Makeover?

Science is not the center of the church, and never should be. But let me get back to that courtyard renovation at my church—a half block from North Carolina State University, which trains more STEM professionals than any other school in the state. If we are not taking the science they are teaching seriously, they will not take us seriously.