A weekly dose of science for the church

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No Ordinary Joe

What’s weird about the assertion that Joseph and others were gullible because they weren’t scientific is that the assertion ignores what we read in the Bible: Joseph was shocked by Mary’s pregnancy.

Thanksgiving, Advent, and the New Year

Our timing was not great. Launching a new endeavor only a few months before a global pandemic was unfortunate. Our central emphasis—forging relationships between church leaders and science professionals as a means of strengthening the church—was difficult in a time of social distancing, remote everything mediated by screens, and communal stresses few of us saw coming.

The Giving in Thanksgiving

Once again, the Bible and science agree. It is the cycle Jesus succinctly summarized in Matthew 10:8–freely we receive, so much so, that out of gratitude we are inspired to freely give.

WOW

WOW

Conceptual studies of awe note that it has its roots in “fear and dread, particularly toward a divine being.” But the common understanding of awe today is no longer fear of God but most often that feeling we get in an encounter with nature. The feeling can be both positive (sunsets) or negative (tornadoes)—or it can even be tinged with fear (standing at the edge of Niagara Falls)… So what does the experience of awe do to us (or for us)?

Science Says: Take A Chill Pill

Science Says: Take A Chill Pill

We all work too hard, some of us more than others. Pastors do it; I’m married to one, and she rarely stops pastoring. Scientists do it. White-collar and blue-collar workers do it. So what does science have to say about Sabbath?

The Enduring Wisdom of St. Clive

The Enduring Wisdom of St. Clive

Why Lewis? Why does he have this enduring impact on Christian thought leaders? And especially, since St. Clive wasn’t particularly gifted in science (he was terrible at math), how has he affected leading Christians in the sciences?

Understanding Unbelief

Understanding Unbelief

To do missions today, we need to understand unbelief. Sure, it is good to track the demographic trends, but it is far more important to understand the mindset of the unaffiliated, the agnostic, and the atheist.

A Simple Suggestion

A Simple Suggestion

Our appreciation of creation and the Creator come less from understanding the Galileo affair or responding to Richard Dawkins’ anti-religious screeds, and more from looking at what science can tell us about the glory being told by the heavens and how fearfully and wonderfully life has been knit together. 

Created Co-Creators

Created Co-Creators

What is the imago dei? How are humans unique from the rest of life and made special by God? This is an important—and highly contested—topic in the history of theology. And today, it’s best approached in dialogue with science.

Extraterrestrial Questions

Extraterrestrial Questions

Yes, we know—in ways the biblical writers didn’t—how huge that world, or the cosmos, is. But we also all know God’s love. And so it’s natural to ask: If Christ saves us on Earth, what if there are other “worlds”? What do we do with Jesus’ atonement?

How Would Your Church Greet E.T.?

How Would Your Church Greet E.T.?

You’ve seen the movies—from E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial to Men in Black to Alien. Sometimes the aliens are friendly, other times not so much. Sometimes they are funny, and others will give you...

Clementines and Exoplanets

Clementines and Exoplanets

How are we finding all of these “exoplanets”—planets beyond our solar system? And how can we tell if they might host life? That’s our focus as we continue our astrobiology series.