A weekly dose of science for the church

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The Standard Model (of Particle Physics)

The Standard Model is the fundamental starting place for anyone trying to understand the stuff within God’s creation. Or to quote Kepler, the Standard Model is one of many ways we are now “thinking God’s thoughts after Him.”

Conversations, Connections, and even Conversion: A Ministry Profile of UCC Vermillion

What started as a joke – what happens when a pastor grabs a beer with a herpetologist? —ended with what could be a Science for the Church newsletter clickbait lede—“Church’s faith and science program inspires former president of student secular society to become a pastor.”

Following the Eastern Star of Epiphany

Many people have proposed different theories about the astronomical events that led the Magi to Jesus. While we might not ever definitely know the scientific event itself, there is enough scientific data to support the idea of a God that can use physical phenomena to accomplish his salvific purposes.

Youth Have Doubts. And That’s Okay.

Youth Have Doubts. And That’s Okay.

We have given our youth space to ask their questions and even voice their doubts. If you follow the research on young persons and faith, that space is important. And that includes helping them engage science and faith. There are good reasons to believe the church’s failure to address such questions is one cause for the continued rising number of religious “nones.”

The Science of Grit and Resilience

The Science of Grit and Resilience

Jesus in the Passion gives us the ultimate example of what researchers often call grit or resilience—a suite of cognitive and character traits working together in combination to achieve a goal in the face of great adversity.

Science and the Resurrection

Science and the Resurrection

Can a scientist believe in resurrection? Can a thinking person really accept one of the most outrageous claims in Christianity? We think so. So how do scientists who are Christians understand the resurrection?

Forgive Us Our Biases

Forgive Us Our Biases

You largely trust your own mind, right? It is a source of reliable knowledge, except, maybe for those moments you can’t remember where you left your keys.  Well, psychology tells a very different story. There are dozens of biases that impact how reasonably, or accurately, or unselfishly our minds function.

A Quantum Series, Volume 3: Is God Rolling the Dice?

A Quantum Series, Volume 3: Is God Rolling the Dice?

Is the world fundamentally determined or undetermined?… All of these possible interpretations point to the enigma of the way the world really is. Does God play dice? Is there a reality to things before we observe them? Are there many worlds? Are there hidden variables that still elude us nearly a century after Einstein postulated them?

A Quantum Series, Volume 1: Can You Fathom the Mysteries of God?

A Quantum Series, Volume 1: Can You Fathom the Mysteries of God?

Quantum mechanics is so weird, so counterintuitive, and so poorly understood at the most fundamental level—dozens of interpretations exist trying to make sense of it—that it is risky to draw theological conclusions. Does God play dice? Do duality, observer effects, and probabilities truly describe the world God created? Or do they point to a veil that hides the microscopic world from us?

It’s All Greek to Me

It’s All Greek to Me

Why don’t our theological voices trust the sciences to offer an accurate picture of the world when we trust the science of classical Greek studies to offer us the tools to study the most sacred texts, the words that bring us to the knowledge of Jesus Christ?

Why Humility Matters

Why Humility Matters

Humility is something all church leaders need—and by humility, I mean something more than just a humiliating experience. It should be a frame of mind, an approach to the world that opens us up to learn what the Spirit has to teach us.

Pair Up With A Scientist. Your Church Will Thank You.

Pair Up With A Scientist. Your Church Will Thank You.

Scientists do want to get the facts right and to accurately investigate the natural world, but even more so, the ones in your pews—especially those on who sit on your boards, teach Sunday school, or volunteer with your youth—really want to be recognized not just as scientists, but as equal partners in the body of Christ. They want to be of service to the church.