A weekly dose of science for the church

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Fearfully and Wonderfully Made

The intricate beauty and complexity of the natural world have long captivated human imagination and inspired scientific inquiry. For many Christians, exploring the wonders of creation through science deepens their faith and appreciation for God’s handiwork.

A Midsummer Reading List

To provide a fresh voice—and thus a fresh summer reading list—we’ve asked C.W. Howell to describe his recommended reading for the summer. Chris (as he goes by in person!) is a writer, who holds a PhD in religion from Duke University. He has taught at Duke and Elon Universities and is the academic director at the C.S. Lewis Foundation. His upcoming first book is a history of the intelligent design movement, to be published by NYU Press. He writes regularly on religion, science, and technology—as well as science fiction, pop culture, and C.S. Lewis—on his website.

Pondering God’s Presence Inside and Outside

Though Augustine does affirm philosophy and the value of natural knowledge, in the opening quotation, he derided those that sought a knowledge of nature but not of the self. This challenge led me to wonder if we, who take in the insights of science and faith, who read the books of nature and Scripture, can have both? Can we put together our searching the cosmos and the soul?

The God of Culture

The God of Culture

What difference does it make that Jesus was a cultural being, born into a specific culture? “With the incarnation, to quote Karl Barth, ‘theology has become anthropology because God has become man.”

When Jesus Was an Embryo

When Jesus Was an Embryo

“This Christmas, think about how our wise, loving, patient God entered the ancient Middle East—“Taking the very nature of a servant”—and trusted himself to the developmental processes that had been created through him.”

The Science of Wisdom

The Science of Wisdom

“In this advent season we remember the messy world Jesus entered. Born amidst controversy to an unwed mother who was likely a teenager, and in a smelly barn where he spent the night in a feeding trough, Jesus entered fully into our complexity. Throughout his years of ministry, he was controversial and unconventional, cutting through religious pretenses to show the heart of God.” Join us for psychologist Mark McMinn’s reflections on growing in wisdom.

Eight-Pound, Six-Ounce Baby Jesus

Eight-Pound, Six-Ounce Baby Jesus

It’s hard to wrap our minds around the idea of baby Jesus – fully God and yet with all the limitations inherent to human infancy. Fuller Seminary professor Justin Barrett guest writes our newsletter today, drawing on knowledge from psychology, cognitive science, and evolution to point to the beauty of this dependence and vulnerability.

Advent Wonder

Advent Wonder

In our 2019 Advent series, we will feature scientists reflecting on the question “What does it mean to say that Jesus was fully human?” We introduce the topic this week.

Grateful Dog

Grateful Dog

Gratitude is probably the most scientifically studied virtue. We could do a Thanksgiving edition every year and focus entirely on new research each time. We know the benefits of being grateful, and we know steps each of us can take to become more grateful. We even know how gratitude correlates with, and often cultivates, other virtues like optimism, humility, and forgiveness.

We’re Changing Our Name

We’re Changing Our Name

How might science work alongside Scripture as a tool for discipleship? Or how can it illustrate sermons, support the biblical teachings, and supplement the wisdom of the church? Can it be a catalyst for worship? May it even draw folks into our ministries, perhaps attracting the “nones” and “dones” to come back?

Hopeful Salutations

Hopeful Salutations

Let’s take a look at some of the scientific work on hope and optimism. Very little of it takes a theological perspective, but as you teach and preach true Christian hope, the science can surely be a good conversation partner.

Why Does Creation Suffer?

Why Does Creation Suffer?

We have gotten so used to mechanical images of God as architect or engineer that we sometimes forget that this is not the primary imagery Scripture uses. God is the shepherd and the parent. Even God as King does not imply total control, but leadership. When God created the world, risk was involved in the same way as when parents choose to have a child. You are making another person, and they will make their own choices.

Cancer and Tornadoes

Cancer and Tornadoes

The problem of evil and suffering faces us in many forms. Truth be told, it is probably the single best argument against belief in a good God. Especially in those cases where evil and suffering are rooted in nature and cannot be excused by human sin. As we begin a series on natural evil and theodicy, we focus this week on some of those faith-rattling natural occurrences.

How can our team help your church engage science?

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Science for the Church

280 Chico Canyon Rd.

Chico, CA 95928

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