A weekly dose of science for the church

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Hope in a Hopeless Time

We need hope grounded in God. I’m willing to call it theological hope. It’s the conviction that God is active when we don’t see it. It’s the promise that “in all things God works for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose

By Popular Demand

To shed light on these texts, Reyes-Ton’s words and Bustard’s images put biblical passages in conversation with what we currently know about flatworms, nociception, microtubules, corals, fox dens and what has sometimes been called the Jesus Christ lizard.

What About Evolution? Greg Talks with a Theologian and a Biologist

Can Christians with a high view of scripture accept the biological theory of evolution? These authors respond with a resounding, “Yes!” As Todd Wilson, co-founder and president of the Center for Pastor Theologians, commented, “The authors guide us through a complex thicket of issues—biological, theological, biblical, and pastoral—with both wisdom and grace.”

On Debates, Differences, and Dismissals

On Debates, Differences, and Dismissals

Unlike my reaction to the previous debate, I was pleasantly surprised by Dawkins v. Collins. There was mutual respect. Dawkins expressed his gratitude for all Collins did to care for their mutual friend, Christopher Hitchens. He also deferred to Collins’s expertise and leadership around Covid-19. It was clear they generally share the same understanding of evolution and science. They also share a common pursuit of truth, especially around the biggest question, Is there a God?.

Time and Eternity: In Appreciation of Robert John Russell, Bridge Builder

Time and Eternity: In Appreciation of Robert John Russell, Bridge Builder

That same passion to integrate science and faith was kindled in me during a course I took with Bob over twenty-five years ago during the first semester of my Ph.D. program… Bob captured my attention and provided me new intellectual panoramas with his description of special relativity’s time dilation and what it meant for Christian faith. I’d never heard anything like that before.

The Role of Faith in a Mental Health Crisis

The Role of Faith in a Mental Health Crisis

One-in-five adults suffered from mental illness (52.9 million Americans) in 2021. For 14.2 million American adults the diagnosis is severe. Of those suffering, fewer than half received treatment and the young (18–25 years-old) are more susceptible to illness and receive the least care. These numbers tell us that wherever five or more gather, not only is Christ among them, but one likely suffers some type of mental illness. This is one place science can help the church.

Do You Mind?

Do You Mind?

there are some in our pews who are particularly called to serve God with their minds. I sense that God celebrates the way truly brilliant people fulfill their calling… I imagine that God says to them, “See, I’ve poured some of my intelligence into you. Isn’t it cool?” And I believe we can learn from them about loving God with our minds.

“I Was Made to Do This.”

“I Was Made to Do This.”

“All vocations are intended by God to manifest His love in the world.”… The purpose to our vocations, to how we use our God-given abilities and passions, is love. So when we talk about science as a Christian vocation, we are talking about how Christians in the sciences labor in order to help others experience God’s love.

Helping Your Church Make Green Choices

Helping Your Church Make Green Choices

As a person of faith, I know that small actions (mustard seeds) can add up to mountains. No one person, church, corporation, action, or green choice is sufficient to reduce the effects of climate change, but we can make a difference by acting together.

“But I Still Love Technology…” (An Easter Meditation)

“But I Still Love Technology…” (An Easter Meditation)

The church has not yet fully grappled with the potential for technology to change human nature, and I believe we need to. Mercer and Trothen agree and notch up the urgency, claiming that “the religions of the world will come to an end, or thrive, depending on how they respond to the topic.”

Easter: An Epistemological Rearrangement of Hope

Easter: An Epistemological Rearrangement of Hope

Hope is like magic, in that it rearranges our epistemological perception of what is real and what is possible. It makes the impossible appear possible. But Dr. Nagib posits that hope is more than magic. Hope is the inner voice that whispers (or shouts) that anything is possible, even in the face of a seemingly hopeless situation.

Considering Culture

Considering Culture

Our brains develop and continually change immersed in specific cultures and, as a result, culture literally embeds in our neuroanatomy. We acquire motor and social skills from our culture that impact how we move and think and function.

This is why the nature vs. nurture distinction is problematic: through culture, nurture becomes part of our nature.