A weekly dose of science for the church

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Science Says: Take a Chill Pill

Vacations are good medicine. Science proves it, as we’re about to show you. So be sure to take that vacation before the summer ends. And even during the busy school year, be sure to find some Sabbath time each and every week.

One Church’s Goal to Go Carbon Neutral

Mount Auburn Presbyterian Church (MAPC) in Cincinnati, Ohio is one of many churches in the Presbyterian denomination that takes part in the...

On Debates, Differences, and Dismissals

Unlike my reaction to the previous debate, I was pleasantly surprised by Dawkins v. Collins. There was mutual respect. Dawkins expressed his gratitude for all Collins did to care for their mutual friend, Christopher Hitchens. He also deferred to Collins’s expertise and leadership around Covid-19. It was clear they generally share the same understanding of evolution and science. They also share a common pursuit of truth, especially around the biggest question, Is there a God?.

Following the Eastern Star of Epiphany

Following the Eastern Star of Epiphany

Many people have proposed different theories about the astronomical events that led the Magi to Jesus. While we might not ever definitely know the scientific event itself, there is enough scientific data to support the idea of a God that can use physical phenomena to accomplish his salvific purposes.

Staff Picks

Staff Picks

We have arrived at the final edition of 2021, which means it’s the time of year for staff picks!

I’ve put together the pieces that the Science for the Church team particularly enjoyed. You may have missed some of these, and that’s something we didn’t want to let happen.

Little Big

Little Big

We’ve had this remarkable evening, year after year, on which we come together for a little while to sing songs, to pray in hopes of feeling connected, to hear a story of a little place that comes out big, of a fleeting moment that turns out to be eternal, of an event that seems insignificance in a world of big plans and big ideas and big struggles, but that becomes the beginning of the most potent, meaningful, and world-changing story of all.

Advent Devotional: God’s Real Presence

Advent Devotional: God’s Real Presence

We were not left alone to navigate the disagreements between those gifted in recognizing the workings of the Spirit and others inclined toward materialism. God knew there are doubting Thomases among us who need to see, touch, and even be touched.

No Ordinary Joe

No Ordinary Joe

What’s weird about the assertion that Joseph and others were gullible because they weren’t scientific is that the assertion ignores what we read in the Bible: Joseph was shocked by Mary’s pregnancy.

Thanksgiving, Advent, and the New Year

Thanksgiving, Advent, and the New Year

Our timing was not great. Launching a new endeavor only a few months before a global pandemic was unfortunate. Our central emphasis—forging relationships between church leaders and science professionals as a means of strengthening the church—was difficult in a time of social distancing, remote everything mediated by screens, and communal stresses few of us saw coming.

The Giving in Thanksgiving

The Giving in Thanksgiving

Once again, the Bible and science agree. It is the cycle Jesus succinctly summarized in Matthew 10:8–freely we receive, so much so, that out of gratitude we are inspired to freely give.

Grateful for Gratitude

Grateful for Gratitude

I’m grateful for gratitude because, when we practice it, life is better. Paul reminds us, in 1 Thessalonians 5:16, that even when life is hard, we’d do well to “be thankful [grateful] in all circumstances” (NLT). I’m grateful for gratitude because it leads to praising life and to praising God for life.

John Wesley and Science: Using Science to Serve the Poor

John Wesley and Science: Using Science to Serve the Poor

Outside of holiness circles, John Wesley’s contributions to our theological understanding, his approach to social action leading to transformation, and the use of science as a tool for social improvement have gone unnoticed or altogether ignored. As this introduction hints, my approach to theology is decidedly Wesleyan and, in the same way Greg Cootsona circles back to St. Clive when he writes, I cannot help but talk about St. John Wesley and his contributions to Christian thought.

Hope for a Worn-Out Church

Hope for a Worn-Out Church

Leading a church already had its own set of challenges. Add 18 months of pandemic, social upheaval, and political unrest, and it is indeed overwhelming. Part of what makes it so difficult is that both pastors and their congregations are overwhelmed and worn out. The data on depression and mental health bear this out. Our collective mental health is not good.