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John Calvin and Science—So Many Surprises

John Calvin and Science—So Many Surprises

“For in this world God blesses us in such a way as to give us a mere foretaste of his kindness, and by that taste to entice us to desire heavenly blessings with which we may be satisfied. As soon as we acknowledge God to be the supreme architect, who has erected the beauteous fabric of the universe, our minds must necessarily be ravished with wonder at his infinite goodness, wisdom, and power.”

Hope for Easter

Hope for Easter

I know cognitively all the reasons I should put my hope in the bodily resurrection of Jesus and the empty tomb. I’ve read my Bible, overcome doubt, and matured in the testimonies of saints’ past and present. I’m particularly aware of the scientists who believe even though we all know the resurrection of Christ is not something that naturally occurs. I’ve written on this theme, leveraging great Christian minds like N.T. Wright and John Lennox.

But according to psychology, in the face of trauma—or any experience that rattles our emotional and spiritual balance— purely rational thought is complicated and emotional imbalance can unravel arguments that previously seemed sensible.

Mark Labberton on Preaching that Changes the State of Knowledge

Mark Labberton on Preaching that Changes the State of Knowledge

What is the Church’s mission? Well, one of the ways you could describe the Church’s mission is with the same aphorism to permanently change knowledge—of God, of our human existence, of the universe, of all things. The mission of God is to bring up all reality into a knowing of those things of God, of his Son Jesus Christ, which has implications that far outstrip any small creedal expression that only in the most finite way gives language to the total reality of God’s existence in life.

An Interview with Mark Labberton on Courageous, Science-Engaged Faith

An Interview with Mark Labberton on Courageous, Science-Engaged Faith

There is no escaping that we live in this kind of a universe, and we can be grateful for the discoveries of science across that enormous spectrum of material existence. So that puts it squarely on the table. The question is, can the church join in? Is it going to step toward that reality—the awesome, really beyond imagination kind of reality? Or are we going to just avoid it? Or are we going to blame science, as if it is the problem?

Preaching That Connects Creation Care to Climate Change

Preaching That Connects Creation Care to Climate Change

The bigger question that pastors must address in their congregation is: do people see faith and science as enemies or partners? “Unless people are willing to have that conversation, chances are they’re not willing to have other conversations,” [McBride] said, such as the one that could bridge an understanding of creation care with concern about climate change.

Building a Foundation of Trust

Building a Foundation of Trust

Trust is essential for our Standard Model to work and when we have seen that relational approach thrive, it is built on the bedrock of candor between church leaders and their science partners. But we all know that trust is a tricky dynamic that rarely happens quickly.

How can our team help your church engage science?

Science for the Church

280 Chico Canyon Rd.

Chico, CA 95928

 

Science for the Church is a registered 501(c)(3) non-profit. EIN no. 88-1178951

Science for the Church

280 Chico Canyon Rd.

Chico, CA 95928

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